Food & Recipes

  • Steamed Catfish With Brown Rice

    Ingredients:
    1 cup brown basmati rice
    1 1/2 cups water
    4 6-ounce US-farmed catfish fillets
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    Parchment paper or aluminum foil
    3 to 4 tablespoons chopped chives
    2 medium carrots, julienned
    2 zucchini, julienned
    2 cups sugar snap peas, ends trimmed

    1. Bring rice and water to a boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat, and simmer for 40 to 45 minutes, or until all the water has absorbed. Do not stir while cooking.

    2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Rinse catfish, and pat dry with a towel. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

    3. Cut out four 20-inch-wide heart-shaped pieces of parchment paper or foil. Place one fillet on each heart shape so that fish sits close to the crease, leaving a 1-inch border around the edges for folding.

    4. Place a quarter of the chives, carrots, zucchini, and peas on each fillet. Seal the packet by folding the edges in small, tight folds. Twist the tip, and tuck underneath.

    5. Place the packets on a large baking sheet (packets may overlap slightly). Cook until the fish is opaque in the center, about 20 minutes. Carefully cut open packets, and place fish and vegetables on a plate. Serve with rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 443 calories; 15 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 80 mg cholesterol; 33 g protein; 44 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 150 mg sodium

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