Food & Recipes

  • In Season: Sour Cherries

    Cherry pie lovers, your time is now. Ideal-for-baking sour cherries, including Morello, Montmorency, and Early Richmond varieties, have super-short growing seasons, making them available for only a few weeks in June and July.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Foods that Fuel

    You’d never head to the yoga studio without your mat or to your spinning class without a pair of bike-friendly shorts, yet many exercisers still approach their workout without the proper fuel. Whether you’re exercising for fitness, health, or weight loss, you’ll reap greater benefits if you feed your body the right foods before and after workouts.

    What and when to eat to maxamize your workout.
    By Christie Aschwan
  • Crab Salad With Avocado, Apple, and Green Beans

    1 1/2 cups green beans, trimmed at both ends, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    2 tablespoons coarse sea salt
    1 cup Greek–style yogurt
    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
    4 tablespoons minced fresh chives
    1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and cubed
    1 ripe avocado, peeled and cubed
    8 ounces cooked lump crabmeat (about 1 cup)

    1. Fill a large pot fitted with a colander with water. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Add green beans and coarse sea salt to colander, and cook until tender, 3 to 4 minutes.

    2. Remove colander from pot. Rinse beans with cold water, drain, and pat dry with a clean towel.

    3. Whisk yogurt, mustard, and fine sea salt in a large, shallow bowl. Add green beans, chives, apple, avocado, and crabmeat. Toss and serve.

    nutrition info per serving: 220 calories; 9 g fat; 38 mg cholesterol; 20 g protein; 17 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 610 mg sodium

  • Pink Grapefruit and Fig Tart

    Shell
    1/2 cup chopped pecans
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1 tablespoon butter
    1/4 cup fresh dates
    2 egg whites
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Filling
    2 grapefruit, peeled and pith removed
    1 whole cinnamon stick or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups fresh or dried mission figs, halved (about 10 fresh figs)
    2 cups Greek–style yogurt

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix pecans, flour, butter, and dates into a fine meal in a food processor. Blend in egg whites and salt.

    2. Coat the inside of a tart pan with natural cooking spray. Line the bottom with parchment paper cut to fit, and coat again. Place dough in pan, and flatten evenly with your fingers to form a thin layer. Score dough by poking it with a fork. Place a piece of parchment paper over the dough and cover with pastry weights (use dried beans if you don’t own weights).

    3. Bake tart dough until the sides begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove parchment paper and continue baking until the bottom has completely cooked, an additional 15 to 20 minutes.

    4. Segment grapefruit, holding fruit over a bowl to reserve approximately 1/4 to 1/2 cup juice. Grate the peel of 1 grapefruit, and place grated peel, cinnamon, honey, sugar, and reserved juice in a saucepan. Simmer on low heat until mixture begins to thicken, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

    5. Remove cinnamon stick from mixture, and stir in figs and grapefruit segments. Place 1 cup yogurt in the bottom of the tart shell, then top with fruit mixture. To serve, cut into 8 portions and garnish with a dollop of remaining yogurt.

    nutrition info per serving: 240 calories; 8 g fat; 8 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 39 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 110 mg sodium

  • Eggplant Sandwich

    Vinagrette
    1/2 cup fresh sawtooth or basil
    1 1/2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    Ground red pepper to taste
    1/2 teaspoon sugar
    4 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil

    Eggplant
    2 Japanese or baby eggplants, halved
    3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    Salt and pepper to taste
    4 tablespoons soft feta cheese
    2 medium red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, and seeded
    1 cup arugula

    1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Puree vinaigrette ingredients in a blender until smooth.

    2. Lightly score the inside of the eggplants, drizzle with olive oil, and lay skin-side down on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with more olive oil and roast for 20 to 25 minutes.

    3. Place eggplant halves face-up on four serving plates, season with salt and pepper, and divide feta cheese, roasted peppers, and arugula among the four halves. Drizzle with vinaigrette (you may have some left over). Serve open-faced.

    nutrition info per serving: 548 calories; 27 g fat; 12 mg cholesterol; 6 g protein; 16 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 453 mg sodium

  • Pan-Fried Sake Shirmp

    Ingredients:

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 teaspoons minced garlic
    2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
    1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    12 Key West pink shrimp with tails on, deveined
    1/3 cup sake
    2 teaspoons unsalted butter
    Salt and pepper to taste
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
    12 mini bamboo skewers
     

    Directions:

    1. Heat oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add garlic, ginger, and red peper flakes, and stir for 1 minute. Add shrimp and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until shrimp begin to curl. Add sake and soy sauce. Cool for another 2 to 3 minuntes. Add butter, and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Season to taste. Stir in parsley and turn off burner.

    2. Place one skewer in each shrimp and serve warm with crusty bread.

    Nutritional analysis: 97 calories; 6 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 22 mg cholesterol; 3 g protein; 2 g carbohydrates; 0 g fiber; 131 mg sodium

  • The Case for White Wine

    Anyone with a regular inclination for cabernet or Chianti must have breathed a booze-infused sigh of relief at some point over the past decade, as recent studies have shown that a moderate amount of red wine has major health benefits, including helping to protect the heart, thwart certain cancers, slow the effects of aging, and prevent neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

    Move over red, white is healthy, too.
    By Sarah Toland
  • Quinoa Croquettes With Cilantro Yogurt Sauce

    Ingredients:
     

    Cilantro Yogurt Sauce
    1 large bunch cilantro, stemmed
    1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
    1/4 cup ume plum vinegar
    1 small white onion, quartered
    2 cups plain yogurt
    1/3 cup olive oil

    Quinoa Croquettes
    1 cup quinoa, washed thoroughly
    1 medium carrot, peeled and coarsely grated
    1 small zucchini, coarsely grated
    1 scallion, finely chopped
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    6 sprigs parsley, minced
    1 large egg
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    Grapeseed oil

    Directions:
    1. Pulse cilantro, soy sauce, vinegar, and onion in a blender or food processor until smooth. Stop the motor and add yogurt and olive oil. Blend until creamy. Transfer to a lidded container, and refrigerate for at leat 1 hour. Recipe makes double the amount of sauce per serving.

    2. Combine quinoa with 2 cups water in a small pot and bring to a boil. Lower hear, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes, until water is completely absorbed. Remove from heat and transfer to a medium bowl to cool.

    3. When cool, add carrot, zucchini, scallion, garlic powder, salt, pasley, egg, and flour. Mix well. Using your hands, form a mixture into patties about 1/2-inch thick and 2 inches in diameter.

    4. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Working in batches, law 5 to 6 quinoa cakes in the pan, and cook for about 3 to 4 minutes. When golden, turn over and cook until the second side is golden. (Chick by lifing up a side with a spatula.) Add additional oil as needed, and remove any brown bits that accumulate in the pan.

    5. Remove cakes from pan and place on a plate lined with a clean, recucled brown paper bag. Serve hot, drizzled with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce.

    Nutritional analysis: 258 calories; 11 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 38 mg cholesterol; 10 g proetin; 30 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 1,483 sodium

  • The Red Meat-Cancer Connection

    Yet another study—this one including more than half a million people—confirms what our docs have been warning us about: Eating red meat increases cancer risk. So we can’t help but wonder, Why is red meat so bad? Recent research revealed at least part of the answer as chronic inflammation.

  • Mini-Strawberry Rhubarb Crumbles

    Ingredients:

    Strawberry Rhubarb Filling
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    4 cups thinly sliced strawberries
    1 large-rib rhubarb, thinly sliced
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

    Crumble Topping
    1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
    1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
    3 tablespoons cold unsalted bytter, cut into pea-size pieces

    Directions:

    1. Melt butter for filling saucepan over medium heat. Add fruit, and cook, stirring constantly for 2 to 3 minutes. Add sugar and lemon juice, and cook for 2 more minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

    2. To make crumble, hand mix flour, brown sugar, and butter pieces until mixture resembles a course meal.

    3. Divide fruit into six ramekins. Crown each with crumble topping until fruit is completely covered. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes, until golden. Serve warm.

    Nutritional analysis: 175 calories; 10 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 25 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 5 mg sodium