Food & Recipes

  • In Season: Acorn Squash

    Luminous golden-orange flesh, nutty flavor, and manageable size make acorn squash a perennial winter favorite. Actually a fruit thanks to its seeds, this gourd delivers magnesium, vitamins C and B6, and blood pressure–lowering potassium with few calories. And you can’t beat acorn’s levels of beta-carotene, an antioxidant the body converts to immunity-boosting vitamin A.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Spot of Tea for Stress

    When the going gets tough, the tough get brewing, a notion legions of tea-loving Brits have subscribed to for centuries. Now, a City University of London study shows that putting a kettle on the stove and sipping tea in times of crisis or unrest can reduce stress—and even make you feel calmer than before the trauma.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Seared Scallops with Udon Noodles

    Serves 4

    For the scallops

    2 tablespoons flour
    2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    8 to 16 scallops (2 to 4 per person)
    1 tablespoon olive oil

    For the noodles
    1 package udon noodles
    2 tablespoons sesame oil
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 scallions, thinly sliced
    1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
    1/4 cup tamari or shoyu (soy sauce)
    Black sesame seeds and fresh cilantro for garnish (optional)

    For the scallops

    1. Combine the first three ingredients in a large Ziploc bag, and shake thoroughly. 
    2. Add scallops, seal the bag, and shake to coat. 
    3. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add scallops, cook 3 minutes on each side, or until done. Remove from heat.

    For the noodles
    1. Cook udon noodles according to package directions; drain.
    2. To prepare dressing, combine sesame oil, garlic, scallions, ginger, and shoyu sauce; mix well.
    3. Place noodles in a medium-sized glass or non-reactive stainless dish; add dressing and mix well to coat noodles. 
    4. Serve noodles hot or cold with 2 to 4 scallops on top, and garnish with sesame seeds and cilantro.

    nutrition info per serving: 378.7 calories; 8.4 g fat; 1.6 g saturated fat; 9.9 mg cholesterol; 14.3 g protein; 60.1 g carbohydrates; 0.8 g fiber; 797.8 mg sodium

  • In Season: Rutabagas

    Best imagined as the lovechild of a cabbage and a turnip, the rutabaga is often overlooked because of its unappetizing name and history as peasant food. But these brassica veggies bring a uniquely sweet yet bitter flavor to most any meal.

    By Jessica Watkins
  • In Season: Rutabagas

    Best imagined as the lovechild of a cabbage and a turnip, the rutabaga is often overlooked because of its unappetizing name and history as peasant food. But these brassica veggies bring a uniquely sweet yet bitter flavor to most any meal.

    By Jessica Watkins
  • Nourishing Happiness

    Two months had passed since my daughter was born, and still I was walking around in a fog. I understand, based on comments from friends and family, that I radiated happiness during this time, but what I remember is struggling with sleeplessness and the constant demands of a newborn—my 8-pound bundle of joy had the clear upper hand.

    The yogic way to feed body and spirit
    By Melissa B. Williams
  • Fruit Fighters

    The term “superfruits” might make you think of cape-clad produce ready to leap to your nutritional rescue. In fact, many marketers want you to believe that mysterious fruits like mangosteens and goji berries have magical health-boosting properties.

    Fend off disease with these natural - and delicious - healers.
    By Molly Lyons
  • Chai

    3 cups water
    1 tablespoon cardamom pods and seeds (about 15)
    1 teaspoon whole cloves
    1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
    2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced (or more to taste)
    2 cinnamon sticks
    1/4 teaspoon fennel seed
    4 teaspoons Assam black
    tea leaves
    1 1/2 cups milk
    Raw honey

    1. In a saucepan, bring water and spices to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes.
    2. Remove from heat, add tea, and steep for 8 minutes.
    3. Strain the tea, discarding the leaves and spices, and return tea to the saucepan. Add milk and heat through. Serve with raw honey to taste.
    Note: If you’re caffeine-sensitive, opt for decaf rooibos tea leaves, or omit the tea altogether and have spiced milk.
    nutrition info per serving (using 2% milk)

    50 calories; 1.9 g fat; 1.2 g saturated fat; 7.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 5.3 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 37.8 mg sodium

  • Sweet Potato and Apple Casserole

    2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1 1/2 cups fresh apple juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/2 teaspoon each cinnamon, nutmeg, ground ginger
    (or ¼ teaspoon freshly grated ginger)
    4 apples, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
    1/3 cup raisins

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 13-by-9-inch baking pan, and add sweet potatoes.
    2. In a small bowl, combine apple juice, vanilla, and spices. Pour mixture over sweet potatoes, cover, and bake for 50 minutes.
    3. Add apples and raisins; cover, and bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Uncover, and bake for 5 minutes to brown the top. Serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving (8): 124 calories; 0 g fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 31 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 22 mg sodium

  • Dal with Winter Vegetables

    3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
    1 cup chopped carrots
    1 cup peeled and cubed
    butternut squash
    4 cups water
    1 tablespoon freshly
    grated ginger
    2 teaspoons turmeric
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1 teaspoon iodized salt (must be iodized on a sattvic diet)
    1 1/2 cups dried yellow lentils
    2 cups broccoli florets
    1 teaspoon brown
    mustard seed
    2 teaspoons cumin seed
    1 teaspoon fennel seed

    1. Add 2 tablespoons ghee (or oil), carrots, and squash to a large saucepan. Sauté for 8 minutes.
    2. Add water, ginger, turmeric, coriander, salt, and lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for one hour.
    3. Add chopped broccoli and an additional cup of water (omit the water if you prefer a thick dal), and simmer for 10 minutes.
    4. While broccoli is cooking, toast brown mustard, cumin, and fennel in a skillet over high heat for 1 minute, or until spices become fragrant.
    5. Add remaining ghee or oil to the skillet, and sauté 1 minute. Combine with the broccoli and lentil mixture, and serve with basmati rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 158 calories; 7.8 g fat; 1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 6.2 g protein; 18.6 g carbohydrates; 7.1 g fiber; 417 mg sodium