Food & Recipes

  • Healthy Chocolate Cake

    Serves 12

    Cake 
    1 2/3 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    3 teaspoons baking soda
    3 1/2 cups pitted dates, divided
    1 cup pineapple chunks in own juice, drained
    1 banana
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    1 cup shredded beets
    3/4 cup shredded carrots
    1/2 cup shredded zucchini
    3 tablespoons natural cocoa powder
    1/2 cup currants
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    1 1/2 cups water
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    Chocolate-nut icing
    1 cup raw macadamia nuts or raw cashews, unsalted
    1 cup vanilla soy milk
    2/3 cup pitted dates
    1/3 cup brazil nuts or hazelnuts
    2 tablespoons cocoa powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix flour, baking powder, and baking soda in a small bowl. Set aside.

    2. In a blender or food processor, puree 3 cups of the dates and all the pineapple, banana, and applesauce. 

    3. Slice remaining dates into ½-inch thick pieces. In a large bowl, mix sliced dates, beets, carrots, zucchini, cocoa powder, currants, walnuts, water, vanilla and flour mixture.

    4. Add the blended fruit mixture to the flour mixture, and mix well. Spread in a 9.5 x 13.5 nonstick baking pan. Bake for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

    5. To make the icing, combine all the icing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Spread icing evenly over warm cake and serve. 

    nutrition info per serving: 300 calories; 12 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 44 g carbohydrates; 7 g fiber; 13 mg sodium

  • Eat for Optimal Health

    One night in May 2008, Emily Boller had an epiphany: Her body was a work of art, and it was high time she crafted it into a masterpiece. The avid painter was used to spending hours on her expressionist landscapes and flowers but little time on her diet and health. A 49-year-old mother of five, Boller says many of her meals were variations on pizza or pasta.

    A micronutrient-rich diet can shrink your waistline and increase wellness. Here’s how.
    By Joel Warner
  • The No-Pain Diet

    Remember the last time you had the flu? You slept poorly and felt exhausted, sore, and achy. You couldn’t think straight, it was a task just to drag yourself through the day. If you have fibromyalgia, that’s how you feel almost every day—and unlike the flu, your symptoms don’t go away.

    Foods to fight fibromyalgia
  • In Season: Tomatillos

    If not for the parchment-like husk encasing a tomatillo, you might mistake this fruit for a diminutive green tomato. But punchy tomatillos are what give Latin green sauces, most notably salsa verde, that signature tartness.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Cherry Coconut Ice Cream

    1 pound fresh and pitted or frozen and partially thawed cherries
    1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/3 cup raw, unfiltered honey 
    2 cups coconut milk 
    1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes for garnish

    1. Using a potato masher, coarsely mash cherries, lemon juice, and vanilla. Let stand at room temperature for 5 minutes, mixing occasionally. Pour hot water in a bowl, and set closed honey jar in water to thin texture. 
    2. In a food processor, puree coconut milk and half of cherry mixture. Add honey and process until smooth. In a bowl, combine puree with remaining cherry mixture.
    3. Place bowl in freezer, stirring occasionally, until cold, but not frozen, about 45 minutes. 
    4. Put in ice cream maker; follow directions.
    5. Place scoops of ice cream in serving dishes and sprinkle with coconut flakes. 

    nutrition info per serving: 452 calories; 33 g fat; 29 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 4 g protein; 4 g fiber; 21 mg sodium

  • Spinach Salad Nicoise With Golden Beets

    Serves 6

    2 tablespoons apple-cider vinegar

    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

    1 garlic clove, minced

    1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

    1 small shallot, minced

    4 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley

    Sea salt and white pepper to taste

    4 medium golden beets, peeled and quartered

    2 cups green beans, cut into 2-inch long pieces

    8 cups baby spinach, loosely packed

    1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh basil

    4 eggs, hard-boiled, peeled, and quartered

    8 oil-packed anchovy fillets (optional)

    1/2 cup pitted Nicoise olives

    1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    1. In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, mustard, and garlic. Whisk in olive oil, shallots, and 2 tablespoons parsley. Season with salt and pepper.
    2. Place beets in half of a stainless steel steamer or on the lower level of a bamboo steamer. Place green beans in the other half of the stainless steamer, or on the top level of the bamboo steamer. Steam over boiling water for 5 minutes.
    3. Remove beans, leaving beets in steamer. Plunge beans into a bowl of cold water; drain and pat dry.
    4. Cook beets for 5 minutes longer, or until tender; remove, plunge into a bowl of cold water, drain, and pat dry.
    5. In a large bowl, toss spinach and basil. Drizzle with just enough dressing to lightly coat leaves; toss, and arrange on a serving platter.
    6. In separate bowls, toss beans and beets with just enough dressing to lightly coat, and arrange over salad. Sprinkle with remaining parsley. Arrange eggs around outside edge of platter.
    7. Arrange anchovies (if using) over salad. Scatter olives and nuts atop salad. Serve immediately, with additional dressing on the side.

    nutrition info per serving: 287 calories; 23 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 141 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 5 g fiber; 233 mg sodium

  • Kitchen Herbs That Heal

    There’s nothing like cultivating your own culinary herbs to make you feel like a great cook. Maybe it’s the pride associated with growing your own ingredients or the way fresh herbs give recipes such a clean punch of flavor.

    Your herb drawer is a genuine apothecary. Here's why.
    By Cheryl Myers
  • Grilled Black Bean Burgers and Portobello Burgers With Rosemary and Avocado

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Serves 4

    1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
    1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
    1 cup finely chopped portobello mushroom
    1 egg, beaten
    2 large garlic cloves, minced
    3 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary leaves
    Dash cayenne pepper
    Sea salt to taste
    3/4 cup gluten-free bread crumbs or cracker crumbs, finely crumbled
    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    4 gluten-free buns
    1 small avocado, peeled and sliced
    8 to 12 leaves red leaf, green leaf, or butter lettuce

     



     

    1. Mash beans in a medium bowl, using a potato masher, until most of the beans are mashed, but some remain visible. Mash in onion, mushroom, and egg, mixing well. Mash in garlic, rosemary, and cayenne. Add salt and more cayenne, as needed.
    2. Add 1/2 cup bread crumbs and stir to mix well. Mixture should be sticky, but hold its shape. Add additional 1/4 cup bread crumbs, if needed.
    3. With damp hands, form bean mixture into 4 patties. Transfer each burger to a plate, and brush tops lightly with 1 tablespoon olive oil.
    4. Preheat broiler to high. Lightly brush a baking sheet with remaining olive oil, and arrange burgers on sheet. Broil for 7 to 8 minutes, turn patties over, and broil for 7 minutes on the other side. While burgers are cooking, split buns in half. Place bottom halves on a serving platter and top with avocado. Tear lettuce and arrange on bottom halves.
    5. Remove burgers from oven, place on buns, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving: 565 calories; 19 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 47 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 10 g fiber; 164 mg sodium

  • Green Grilling

    Seventy-seven percent of North American households own an outdoor grill, and almost half light up the barbecue twice a week during the summer, according to the Hearth, Patio & Barbeque Association. All that grilling takes a toll on the environment, but you can lessen the impact of your summer cookouts.

    By Jodi Helmer
  • Welcome Back, White Fish

    Oily swimmers like salmon and sardines tend to get all the health credit for their high doses of omega-3 fatty acids, but consuming any type of fish may be better than eating none, at least for diabetics.

    By Lindsey Galloway