Food & Recipes

  • Raisin Collards and Carrots

    Serves 4

    Vegetables
    4 bunches collard greens, leaves removed and chopped
    4 carrots, grated

    Sauce
    1 medium cucumber
    1/2 cup raisins
    1/4 cup raw almond butter
    2 teaspoons Dr. Fuhrman's Riesling Raisin Vinegar (optional; available at drfuhrman.com)
    1 teaspoon nutritional yeast
    1/2 cup currants (optional)

    1. Steam collard greens for 15 minutes. Add grated carrots and steam another 5 minutes.

    2. Blend all sauce ingredients in a blender until smooth. Add sauce to collards and carrots, and toss. If desired, stir in currants. Serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving: 238 calories; 14 g fat; 8 g saturated fat; 86 mg cholesterol; 11 g protein; 19 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 162 mg sodium

  • Citrus Salad With Orange Peanut Dressing

    Serves 2

    Dressing
    1/2 cup orange juice
    1/8 cup unsalted peanut butter 
    1/8 cup raw cashew butter
    2 tablespoons rice vinegar
    1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
    ¼-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
    1/4 medium clove garlic, chopped

    Salad
    15 ounces (about 10 cups) baby lettuce 
    1 avocado, sliced
    1 orange, peeled, halved, and sliced
    1/2 small sweet onion, thinly sliced 
    1 tablespoon unhulled sesame seeds 

    1. Place dressing ingredients in a blender or food processor, and blend until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to serve. 

    2. Place lettuce in a large bowl; arrange avocado, orange, and onions on top.

    3. In a pan over medium heat, toast sesame seeds for 3 minutes, tossing often to prevent burning. 4. Just before serving, lightly dress salad and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

    nutrition info per serving: 474 calories; 30 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 36 g carbohydrates; 7 g fiber; 215 mg sodium

  • Healthy Chocolate Cake

    Serves 12

    Cake 
    1 2/3 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    3 teaspoons baking soda
    3 1/2 cups pitted dates, divided
    1 cup pineapple chunks in own juice, drained
    1 banana
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    1 cup shredded beets
    3/4 cup shredded carrots
    1/2 cup shredded zucchini
    3 tablespoons natural cocoa powder
    1/2 cup currants
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    1 1/2 cups water
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    Chocolate-nut icing
    1 cup raw macadamia nuts or raw cashews, unsalted
    1 cup vanilla soy milk
    2/3 cup pitted dates
    1/3 cup brazil nuts or hazelnuts
    2 tablespoons cocoa powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix flour, baking powder, and baking soda in a small bowl. Set aside.

    2. In a blender or food processor, puree 3 cups of the dates and all the pineapple, banana, and applesauce. 

    3. Slice remaining dates into ½-inch thick pieces. In a large bowl, mix sliced dates, beets, carrots, zucchini, cocoa powder, currants, walnuts, water, vanilla and flour mixture.

    4. Add the blended fruit mixture to the flour mixture, and mix well. Spread in a 9.5 x 13.5 nonstick baking pan. Bake for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

    5. To make the icing, combine all the icing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Spread icing evenly over warm cake and serve. 

    nutrition info per serving: 300 calories; 12 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 44 g carbohydrates; 7 g fiber; 13 mg sodium

  • Eat for Optimal Health

    One night in May 2008, Emily Boller had an epiphany: Her body was a work of art, and it was high time she crafted it into a masterpiece. The avid painter was used to spending hours on her expressionist landscapes and flowers but little time on her diet and health. A 49-year-old mother of five, Boller says many of her meals were variations on pizza or pasta.

    A micronutrient-rich diet can shrink your waistline and increase wellness. Here’s how.
    By Joel Warner
  • Gluten-Free Taste Test

    My wife used to love breads  and baked goods, until every sandwich or plate of pancakes meant hours of bloating and discomfort. Her pain was brought on by a sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. She eventually cut gluten from her diet entirely. That was 12 years ago.

    15 flavor-packed picks
    By Mitchell Clute
  • How Safe is Your Food?

    With brown hair and a wide, trusting smile, Ashley Armstrong looks like your average happy, healthy 5-year-old. She practices ballet, plays softball, and just started to learn the guitar.

    Today, food safety is no longer as simple as saying no to expired milk. As major health problems continue to surface in America’s food supply, here’s what to do to protect you and your family.
    By Melanie Warner
  • The No-Pain Diet

    Remember the last time you had the flu? You slept poorly and felt exhausted, sore, and achy. You couldn’t think straight, it was a task just to drag yourself through the day. If you have fibromyalgia, that’s how you feel almost every day—and unlike the flu, your symptoms don’t go away.

    Foods to fight fibromyalgia
  • In Season: Tomatillos

    If not for the parchment-like husk encasing a tomatillo, you might mistake this fruit for a diminutive green tomato. But punchy tomatillos are what give Latin green sauces, most notably salsa verde, that signature tartness.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Grilled Black Bean Burgers and Portobello Burgers With Rosemary and Avocado

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Serves 4

    1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
    1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
    1 cup finely chopped portobello mushroom
    1 egg, beaten
    2 large garlic cloves, minced
    3 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary leaves
    Dash cayenne pepper
    Sea salt to taste
    3/4 cup gluten-free bread crumbs or cracker crumbs, finely crumbled
    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    4 gluten-free buns
    1 small avocado, peeled and sliced
    8 to 12 leaves red leaf, green leaf, or butter lettuce

     



     

    1. Mash beans in a medium bowl, using a potato masher, until most of the beans are mashed, but some remain visible. Mash in onion, mushroom, and egg, mixing well. Mash in garlic, rosemary, and cayenne. Add salt and more cayenne, as needed.
    2. Add 1/2 cup bread crumbs and stir to mix well. Mixture should be sticky, but hold its shape. Add additional 1/4 cup bread crumbs, if needed.
    3. With damp hands, form bean mixture into 4 patties. Transfer each burger to a plate, and brush tops lightly with 1 tablespoon olive oil.
    4. Preheat broiler to high. Lightly brush a baking sheet with remaining olive oil, and arrange burgers on sheet. Broil for 7 to 8 minutes, turn patties over, and broil for 7 minutes on the other side. While burgers are cooking, split buns in half. Place bottom halves on a serving platter and top with avocado. Tear lettuce and arrange on bottom halves.
    5. Remove burgers from oven, place on buns, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving: 565 calories; 19 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 47 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 10 g fiber; 164 mg sodium

  • Kitchen Herbs That Heal

    There’s nothing like cultivating your own culinary herbs to make you feel like a great cook. Maybe it’s the pride associated with growing your own ingredients or the way fresh herbs give recipes such a clean punch of flavor.

    Your herb drawer is a genuine apothecary. Here's why.
    By Cheryl Myers