Balance

  • Vegan in the Raw

    After decades of suffering from lactose intolerance and sensitivity to basically anything with taste, I decided to change my diet. But my fledgling gastronomic experience as a vegan did nothing to prepare me for my first raw-food meal. After all, it's not terribly hard to be a vegan—or just a vegetarian—the challenge lies in being a healthy one.

    One women's newfound love for living foods
    By Vicki Confrey
  • Entering Silence

    I shivered in the pitch-black night as a steady rain showered my head. I sank deeper into a state of abject loneliness with every miserable drop. My saturated sleeping bag weighed me down as I searched blindly for my flashlight, all the while berating myself for not tying up the tarp before I fell asleep beneath a formerly clear, starry night.

    How one woman survived three days in the wilderness—alone.
    By Laura Gates
  • Moving Through Addiction

    For Ana Forrest, yoga began as a form of poor man’s therapy. Sexually abused as a child, living in poverty, not having enough to eat, Forrest’s early life seemed a setup for addiction. In the beginning she turned to drugs, alcohol, and food—anything that could help her check out. At 18, her addiction was bulimia. She ate and ate and then purged.

    Sun Salutes offer an alternative 12-step program.
    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • Yoga Rx: Running Injuries

    No strangers to pain, runners do a lot of damage to their bodies while pounding the pavement or tackling the trails. Yoga can help by strengthening weak, underutilized muscles while healing overworked or injured ones, as well as tendons and joints, says Baron Baptiste, former athletic trainer and creator of Baptiste Power Yoga.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Pre-Swim Stretches, Post-Swim Ease

    Before jumping in the pool, warm up to prevent cramps and reduce your likelihood of injury. “Stretching heightens joint mobility,” says Dave Scott, six-time Ironman winner and fitness consultant. When you stretch, the muscle fibers lengthen, allowing for more contraction force (also known as power in the water).

    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • The Green Party

    19 ways to celebrate summer and decrease your impact on the earth:

    Before the Bash

    1. Call or send an Evite to your guests, and skip the cute little note cards. In addition to saving trees, your family and friends will get quicker notice about your party—which also means swifter RSVPs.

    Eco-entertaining made simple.
    By Heather Larson
  • Thai'd Together

    If you’re anything like me, you might fantasize occasionally about having someone do your yoga for you. You would reap all the delight and benefit of the stretch, but with none of the awkwardness of having to heave yourself into a backbend. Just the thought of outsourcing yoga can send me swooning into Savasana.

    Pair yoga and massage for a deep release.
    By Rana Lee Araneta
  • No Need to Meditate Perfectly

    I sat cross-legged on the living-room rug, closed my eyes, took a deep breath, and tried to quiet my mind. Alas, random thoughts persisted, flickering about like fireflies on a summer evening. After five minutes, I abandoned my Zen pose. I would have rather folded laundry or gone on a 3-mile run—anything with more tangible results.

    How one woman learned to let go and welcome stillness.
    By Susan Lembo Balik
  • Ink Therapy

    For years, I’ve tried to discipline myself to write regularly in a journal. I’ve bought beautiful, leather-bound journals and expensive pens, hoping that these treats would encourage my writing. I always filled the first page, at least, but the journals invariably ended up on a shelf, accumulating dust instead of ink.

    One man's success in writing away the weight of the world.
    By E.C. Roy
  • Say It Peacefully

    At my Memorial Day barbecue one year, I watched in awe as my friend Kathryn fielded baiting questions from a handsome, slightly drunk guest. I can’t remember the words she used, but instead of taking offense, Kathryn responded respectfully, without sacrificing her truth or compromising her dignity.

    Navigate disagreements by communicating with compassion.
    By Katy Butler