Balance

  • The OM Advantage

    I got into yoga as a college student on a typically tight budget. To save money I decided to memorize my favorite sequence and practice at home. It was love at first Sun Salute.

    The joys of a home yoga practice don’t have to come with years of experience. This sequence designed by yoga icons Rodney Yee and Colleen Saidman will help you get started, and stick with it.
    By Nora Simmons
  • My First Time—A Drive on the Wild Side

    All my life, I’d always played it safe. So when I turned 50, I vowed to challenge myself physically and be more daring. Over the ensuing seven years, I took up yoga, qigong, cross-country skiing, kayaking, and bicycling. But none of these activities satisfied my yearning to be “wild.” I couldn’t stop fantasizing about riding a motorcycle.

    How one woman let her fantasies ride off into the sunset
    By Susan Partridge
  • Come Into Clarity

    Yoga offers powerful self-healing tools for women with breast cancer—from diagnosis and treatment through recovery. How you practice yoga is as important as what you practice, so be sure to:

    Balance effort with relaxation.
    Treat yourself kindly.
    Challenge yourself—but never strain in a pose.

    How yoga helps breast cancer patients find balance again, on and off the mat.
    By Carol Krucoff
  • Slow Down, You Move Too Fast.

    The day the dog started barking whenever I flipped open my cell phone, I knew something was wrong. I’d had hints before, of course: Kids who didn’t feel listened to, work details I couldn’t remember, even a seriously stubbed toe when I tried to push a laundry basket across the floor with one foot while holding two trash cans in my arms.

    Giving up multitasking brings surprising rewards.
    By Barbara Rowley
  • Vegan in the Raw

    After decades of suffering from lactose intolerance and sensitivity to basically anything with taste, I decided to change my diet. But my fledgling gastronomic experience as a vegan did nothing to prepare me for my first raw-food meal. After all, it's not terribly hard to be a vegan—or just a vegetarian—the challenge lies in being a healthy one.

    One women's newfound love for living foods
    By Vicki Confrey
  • Yoga Rx: Running Injuries

    No strangers to pain, runners do a lot of damage to their bodies while pounding the pavement or tackling the trails. Yoga can help by strengthening weak, underutilized muscles while healing overworked or injured ones, as well as tendons and joints, says Baron Baptiste, former athletic trainer and creator of Baptiste Power Yoga.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Moving Through Addiction

    For Ana Forrest, yoga began as a form of poor man’s therapy. Sexually abused as a child, living in poverty, not having enough to eat, Forrest’s early life seemed a setup for addiction. In the beginning she turned to drugs, alcohol, and food—anything that could help her check out. At 18, her addiction was bulimia. She ate and ate and then purged.

    Sun Salutes offer an alternative 12-step program.
    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • Entering Silence

    I shivered in the pitch-black night as a steady rain showered my head. I sank deeper into a state of abject loneliness with every miserable drop. My saturated sleeping bag weighed me down as I searched blindly for my flashlight, all the while berating myself for not tying up the tarp before I fell asleep beneath a formerly clear, starry night.

    How one woman survived three days in the wilderness—alone.
    By Laura Gates
  • Pre-Swim Stretches, Post-Swim Ease

    Before jumping in the pool, warm up to prevent cramps and reduce your likelihood of injury. “Stretching heightens joint mobility,” says Dave Scott, six-time Ironman winner and fitness consultant. When you stretch, the muscle fibers lengthen, allowing for more contraction force (also known as power in the water).

    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • The Green Party

    19 ways to celebrate summer and decrease your impact on the earth:

    Before the Bash

    1. Call or send an Evite to your guests, and skip the cute little note cards. In addition to saving trees, your family and friends will get quicker notice about your party—which also means swifter RSVPs.

    Eco-entertaining made simple.
    By Heather Larson