Alternative Medicine

  • Sugar Feeds Cancer

    The next time you’re tempted by the candy aisle, you may want to abandon your grocery cart and run in the opposite direction. In a study at the National Institute of Public Health in the Netherlands, researchers found that cancer risk more than doubled for those patients who regularly consumed sugar. The message is simple: Sugar feeds cancer.

    How your sweet tooth fuels the disease
    By George L. Redmon, PhD, ND
  • 5 Myths Behind Your Milk Carton

    We’ve all seen the billboards, commercials, and magazine ads in which celebrities, in the spirit of good health and modern marketing, smile for the camera while sporting their very best milk mustache.

  • A Great Tomato Sauce

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    This sauce is the perfect way to make your comfort food justifiably healthy.

    2 tablespoons sunflower oil

    1 clove garlic, crushed

    ½ onion, chopped into small cubes

    2 ½ cups water

    12 ½ ounces vine tomatoes, chopped in half

    ¼ teaspoon balsamic vinegar

    ½ teaspoon umeboshi plum purée

    ½-inch fresh red chili (for spice, optional)

    1 ounce basil

    2 tablespoons coconut milk

    Heat sunflower oil in a pan over medium heat; add garlic and onion and cook for 2 minutes. Add ½ cup of the water to onions and garlic; let onions absorb the water then add 1 cup of water. Add tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, plum purée, and the remaining 1 cup of water. Simmer over medium to low heat for 10 minutes. Add chili, half of the basil, and coconut milk. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Add a little extra water if you like a runny sauce; reduce it further if you like a drier and more intense sauce. Source: Reprinted with permission from Honestly Healthy For Life © 2014 by Natasha Corrett and Vicki Edgson, Sterling Publishing Co, Inc. Photography by Lisa Linder.

    Serves 2

  • Carrot Dogs

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Both kids and adults will want to get their hands on these unique and healthy “hotdogs.”

    2 long, straight carrots (hotdog shaped!)

    2 whole wheat hotdog buns, or 2 slices whole grain bread

    Spinach (cooked and drained, or fresh)

    Ketchup

    Mustard

    Sauerkraut

    Onions (raw, cooked, or caramelized)

    Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Boil carrots 10 to 15 minutes, or until they are hotdog-like soft. Drain and cut them in half lengthwise. Toast buns or bread if you desire. Place the carrots in the buns and top with all your fixings. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 2

  • Carrot, Avocado, and Turmeric Soup

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    A little spicy and a little sweet, this soup is easy to make and even better to enjoy.

    2 ½ cups fresh carrot juice

    1 Haas avocado, peeled and pitted

    ½ teaspoon ginger powder, or 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

    ½ tablespoon tamari

    ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    ¼ cup pumpkin seeds

    Blend all ingredients except the pumpkin seeds in a blender or food processor until rich and creamy. Heat a skillet over medium heat and add pumpkin seeds and a sprinkle of salt. Toast seeds until they turn just golden, then quickly transfer them to a cool plate. Serve soup as-is and top with pumpkin seeds, or heat on stove to desired temperature. Source: Choosing Raw by Gena Hamshaw. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014 Photo credit: Hannah Kaminsky.

    Serves 2

  • Triple Pepper-Crowned Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Eat like royalty with this dish that tastes just as good as it looks.

    2 cups short-grain brown rice

    4 cups vegetable broth

    1 onion, diced

    3 to 4 cloves garlic, minced

    8 ounces mushrooms, sliced

    3 to 4 cups kale, stems removed and leaves torn into pieces and cooked

    Red, yellow, and orange bell peppers, steamed or roasted

    In a rice cooker or on stovetop, prepare the rice as directed using the broth (not water) and add the onion, garlic, and mushrooms. Stir the warm rice for about 1 minute, until it uniformly becomes a bit creamier and stickier—you now have risotto! Arrange a bed of cooked kale on each plate and, using a small bowl or teacup as a mold, scoop about ½ cup of risotto onto the kale. Crown the risotto with peppers and serve with a salad or steamed broccoli. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 4

  • July 4th


    This Fourth of July, enjoy the explosion of fireworks, but don't let all the treats blow up your diet, says a Kansas State University dietitian.
     
    Amber Howells, director of the coordinated program in dietetics offered by the hospitality management and dietetics department in the university's College of Human Ecology, says moderation is key.

    Dietitian shares tip to keep the Fourth from adding five to your waistline
    Dick Benson
    July 4th
  • Mind-Body DNA

    What is the first thing that comes to mind for achieving optimal wellness? Sure, there are many factors to consider, but most people don’t put meditation at the top of the list for physical health and long-term wellness. However, this view may change as fascinating research continues to enlighten us on the extensive health benefits of this time-honored practice.

    How meditation supports the foundation of healing
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Medical Coexistence

    Many Americans equate the term traditional medicine with the current Western, pharmaceutical medical model. We go to the doctor, complain about our ailments, fill our prescriptions, and file insurance claims. Though it’s now the norm, many are not aware that this Western form of medicine has only existed for a little longer than two centuries.

    Can traditional medicine find a place in the current medical model?
    By Nancy Angelini and Thomas Dadant
  • Simply Cinnamon

    Cinnamon is usually considered a winter spice: You might bust it out when it’s your turn to host the company Christmas party or you’ll see it added to your local bar’s seasonal drink menu, but this spice doesn’t have to hide when temperatures begin to rise.

    Why you need to add this spice to your life
    By Erica Tasto