Alternative Medicine

  • Fitness Focused

    The most physically fit young adults grow into the most mentally fit middle-aged adults, according to new research by the University of Minnesota. The study followed a wide sample of participants for 20 years and discovered that those who performed best on the fitness test in their younger years did better on cognitive tests years later.

  • Sleep, Naturally

    When it comes to choosing a sleep aid, one study found that whether the product was natural was a top factor, right up there with the perception on how well it worked, side effects, and how it would impact their quality of life. For the most natural sleep aid, look no further than your own pantry! Next time you’ve got the munchies before bed, try reaching for these foods.

  • Don’t Let Joint Pain Slow You Down

    Arthritis is a painful, chronic disease that can have a major impact on quality of life. As joints deteriorate, simple tasks become difficult: opening a jar, walking to the mailbox, handling tools. With time, mobility becomes more restricted. What’s worse, arthritis sufferers must face the unkind reality that their condition may gradually worsen.

    Take control of your arthritis with these natural remedies
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Potlucks with Pizzazz

    Warm weather isn’t the only reason you need to throw a party this season—and neighborhood block parties, family reunions, and potlucks are all ripe with opportunities for you to showcase your inner chef. If you’re bored with the same old buffet line—cold cuts, pasta salad, and puppy chow—here are some unique, healthy ideas to bring to the table.

    Share these innovative dishes with your friends and family
    By Erica Tasto
  • Simply Cinnamon

    Cinnamon is usually considered a winter spice: You might bust it out when it’s your turn to host the company Christmas party or you’ll see it added to your local bar’s seasonal drink menu, but this spice doesn’t have to hide when temperatures begin to rise.

    Why you need to add this spice to your life
    By Erica Tasto
  • Medical Coexistence

    Many Americans equate the term traditional medicine with the current Western, pharmaceutical medical model. We go to the doctor, complain about our ailments, fill our prescriptions, and file insurance claims. Though it’s now the norm, many are not aware that this Western form of medicine has only existed for a little longer than two centuries.

    Can traditional medicine find a place in the current medical model?
    By Nancy Angelini and Thomas Dadant
  • Playing the Name-Game

    This last spring, Josephine Briggs, MD, the director of what has been called the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), asked for public comment on a proposed name change for the agency. Briggs proposed that NCCAM be renamed the National Center for Research in Complementary and Integrative Health (NCRCIH).

    The search for the proper term to describe alternatives to conventional medicine
    By John Weeks
  • All About: Rosemary Tea

    WHAT IT IS: Native to the Mediterranean region, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a fragrant, perennial herb. It is often used to enhance flavors when cooking, particularly in hearty foods such as stuffing, roasted meats, and Italian dishes.

  • Ripe for the Sleeping

    Sleep issues are an epidemic in America. While many people look for answers in laboratories, not enough of us check the local produce section for the path to healthier sleep.

    Using superfruits instead of drugs for a good night’s sleep
    By Shelley Alexander, DO
  • Mac-oh-geez!

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    This dairy-free delight tastes like comfort food without packing on the pounds. Bake as-is, or add chicken, broccoli, carrots, or peas for a heartier dish. Serves 4-6.

    PASTA

    >3 to 3 ½ cups dried cut pasta (e.g. macaroni, penne)

    SAUCE

    ½ cup raw Brazil nuts

    3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

    1 medium clove garlic

    2 teaspoons arrowroot powder

    1 teaspoon sea salt

    ½ teaspoon onion powder

    ¼ teaspoon (rounded) dry mustard

    1 cup water

    1 ½ cups plain nondairy milk, unsweetened

    1 to 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (optional, if omitted add extra milk)

    BREADCRUMB TOPPING (OPTIONAL):

    ¾ to 1 ¼ cups dry whole-grain breadcrumbs

    ½ tablespoon olive oil

    Couple pinches sea salt

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees, then start cooking pasta. While pasta is cooking, blend all sauce ingredients in a blender or in a deep bowl with an immersion blender. When pasta is almost tender, fully drain (don’t rinse). Mix noodles with sauce, and immediately pour into a lightly oiled 8 x 12 inch baking dish. Mix breadcrumb toppings in a small bowl, then sprinkle over top of casserole. Cover with foil and bake for 17 to 18 minutes. Then, remove foil cover and bake another 5 to 7 minutes or until topping is golden brown and crisp. Don’t over-bake or the sauce will get too thick. Remove from oven and place casserole on a trivet—not on top of oven because residual heat from the oven will continue to thicken the sauce. Source: Let Them Eat Vegan! 200 Deliciously Satisfying Plant-Powered Recipes for the Whole Family by Dreena Burton. Available from Da Capo Press, a member of The Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2012. Learn more at plantpoweredkitchen.com.