Alternative Medicine

  • Wanna Soak Up the Sun?

    Relaxing in the warmth of a summer day not only feels great, but it’s also an excellent way to raise your vitamin D levels. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which is needed to maintain strong bones. This important nutrient also helps muscles to move, nerves to communicate, and the immune system to fight off infections.

  • The Cranberry’s Hidden Power

    It’s a bit of a taboo topic. It can be painful or embarrassing. It can wake you up at night or make you nervous to leave home. And if you have one, you know it without a doubt: It’s a urinary tract infection.

    Safe, simple, and successful UTI prevention
    By Dan Souza
  • Keep Your Peepers!

    According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are considered to be visually impaired. 65 percent are 50 years old or older. Here are some ways to prevent and ease the loss of sight:

    >> Eat veggies rich in beta-carotene and vitamin A, such as squash and carrots.

  • Thai Herbal Medicine

    “Everything is medicine.”

    This motto came from Buddha’s doctor, Jivaka. We believe this should be reinterpreted to fit modern times. Certain manufactured foods available today are so toxic to the system that we would argue they don’t have enough redeeming nutritional or medicinal qualities to offset the dangers of eating them.

    A modern look at a traditional practice
    By C. Pierce Salguero & Nephyr Jacobsen
  • Regaining Control

    Whether it’s bloating, cramping, or baffling mood swings that leave you wallowing on the bathroom floor in tears, the week before Aunt Flow comes to town can be a rollercoaster ride of epic proportions.

    Ten Tips to Naturally Relieve PMS
    By Cathy Margolin, LAc, Dipl.OM
  • Cooling Chronic Inflammation

    Chronic inflammation can progress unnoticed for years. Sure, there can be symptoms such as fatigue, brain fog, increased wrinkles, or aches and pains, but most people write these off as normal signs of aging.

    Lifestyle adjustments that can help us tame the pain and access the benefits of a healthier body
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Sweet-and-Sour Asian Cabbage and Kale

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    SERVES 4

    1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons tamari

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    1 tablespoon Grade B maple syrup

    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    4 cups stemmed and chopped lacinato kale, in bite-size pieces

    Sea salt

    2 cups shredded red cabbage

    1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

    Put the tamari, lime juice, maple syrup, toasted sesame oil, and ginger in small bowl and stir to combine. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the kale and a pinch of salt and sauté for four minutes. Add the cabbage and another pinch of salt and sauté for two minutes. Add the tamari mixture and cook until tender, about two minutes. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson.

  • Cider-Braised Kale with Apples and Sweet Cherries

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4-6

    2 tablespoons bacon fat

    1 small red onion, thinly sliced

    2 bunches Lacinato kale, stems removed and leaves coarsely chopped

    1 apple, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced

    1 cup dried sweet cherries

    ¼ cup hard cider

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    Melt the bacon fat in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Toss the red onion into the hot fat and fry until fragrant and softened, about three minutes. Stir in the apples and fry them until tender enough to pierce with a fork, about four minutes, then toss in the kale, and cook until barely wilted. It should only take a minute. Stir the sweet cherries and hard cider into the wilted kale and apples. Simmer until the liquid is mostly evaporated, about five minutes. Stir in the apple cider vinegar and serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther

  • Buzzword: “Text Neck”

    Text neck: The act of people hunching over their mobile gadgets, which leads to neck strain, headaches, and pain in the shoulders and even hands and arms. This pain can last a lifetime if habits don’t change. Source: NBC News

    Fixing text neck

  • Indian Greens

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    8 cups stemmed and chopped Swiss chard, in bite-size pieces

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    ¼ teaspoon cumin seeds

    ¼ teaspoon black or brown mustard seeds

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    ½ teaspoon turmeric

    ¼ teaspoon curry powder

    1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Sea salt

    1 cup canned diced tomatoes, juices reserved

    1 cup canned chickpeas, drained, rinsed, and mixed with a spritz of lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt

    ¼ cup coconut milk

    ¼ teaspoon Grade B maple syrup

    Put the chard in a large bowl, add cold water to cover, and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the cumin seeds and mustard seeds and sauté until they begin to pop. Immediately stir in the ginger. Add the chard, turmeric, curry powder, pepper, a pinch of salt, and 2 tablespoons of the juice from the tomatoes. Sauté for two minutes. Add the chickpeas and tomatoes and sauté for three minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and maple syrup and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson; Photo Credit: Leo Gong.