Alternative Medicine

  • All About Arbor Day

    >> The first Arbor Day started when J. Sterling Morton oversaw the planting of one million trees.

    >> The National Association of State Foresters, the Arbor Day Foundation, and the US Forest Service help plant the trees found in America’s national and state forests.

    >>  Some places around the world take a whole week to celebrate Arbor Day!

  • The Canopy Project

    Each year Earth Day celebrates the world we live in by demon­strating support for our environment. This year, earthday.org is putting a special emphasis on The Canopy Project. People participating in The Canopy Project help impoverished commu­nities by planting trees.

  • Health Tips: I Can See Clearly Now…

    Days at work in front of a screen can be followed up by nights on the home computer, leading the American Optometric Association to coin the term “computer vision syndrome.”

    Here are a few ways to fight it, courtesy of leading integrative eye care practi­tioner Edward Kondrot, MD.

  • Brown Algae as Medicine

    Resourceful seaside residents have been eating seaweed for thousands of years. The Native Americans ate it, many prehistoric cultures did, and it is common in Asian cuisine today. What our ancestors knew, science has confirmed: Seaweeds are a healthy foodstuff.

  • Muddling the Multivitamin Message

    A recent issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine featured three studies about multivitamin/mineral supplements. An accompanying editorial was entitled “Enough Is Enough: Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements,” which would seem to indicate flagrantly negative findings in the studies.

    By David Katz, MD
  • What Vitamin Supplements Do and How to Pick One

    Here’s another perspective on the pieces run in the New York Times and the Annals of Internal Medicine. There are many systemic flaws with the studies referenced in these editorials.

    By Adam Swenson
  • Defeating Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is a killer that doesn’t care about race, religious beliefs, or socio­economic status. Christine Horner, MD, a nationally recognized surgeon and the author of Waking the Warrior Goddess, says that once a woman reaches her mid-20s she catches cancer’s attention. Dr.

    The exercise/sex connection
    By George L. Redmon, PhD, ND
  • Roasted Salmon and Asparagus with Lemon-Caper-Dill Aioli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 4 SERVINGS

    FOR SALMON AND ASPARAGUS

    1 pound asparagus, trimmed

    Cooking spray

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1/2 teaspoon salt, divided

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper, divided

    1 1/2 pounds skinless salmon fillet

    FOR AIOLI

    3/4 cup mayonnaise

    1 clove garlic, minced

    1 teaspoon finely grated organic lemon rind

    1 tablespoon lemon juice

    1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill

    1 tablespoon chopped capers

    2 teaspoons finely minced red onion

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    To make the salmon and asparagus: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Arrange the asparagus in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle with half the salt and pepper. Place the salmon fillet directly on top of the asparagus. Sprinkle with the remaining salt and pepper. Roast the salmon for 18 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork.

    To make the aioli, combine the mayonnaise and the re­maining ingredients in a small bowl until well blended. Serve the salmon and asparagus with aioli. Source: Fast and Simple Gluten-Free by Gretchen F. Brown, RD

  • Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 2 SERVINGS

    1 1/2 cups fresh strawberries (about 12) hulled

    1/2 cup soaked cashews

    1 tablespoon maple syrup or agave nectar

    1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

    Sliced fresh strawberries, for serving (optional)

    Put all the ingredients in a blender and process on medium speed until smooth. Serve with sliced strawberries if desired. Stored in a sealed container in the refrig­erator. Strawberry Cashew Yogurt will keep for three days. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Corn­bleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Pan-Seared Halibut with Melted Cherry Tomatoes

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    FISH

    4 (4 to 6 ounce) halibut fillets

    ½ teaspoon finely ground unre­fined sea salt

    ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves

    1 tablespoon clarified butter (recipe follows)

    TOMATOES

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 shallot, minced

    2 cloves garlic, minced

    1 pound cherry tomatoes, halved

    ¼ cup chopped fresh tarragon

    CLARIFIED BUTTER

    1 pound unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces

    To make the butter, place the butter in a wide sauté pan set over low heat. Allow the butter to melt slowly. As it heats, froth and foam will gather on top of the liquid butter. Skim this off and discard it. Continue heating the butter until it becomes perfectly clear, about 10 minutes. Set a fine-mesh sieve over a bowl and line it with a double layer of cheesecloth or a single layer of butter muslin. Pour the melted butter through the cloth and into the bowl. Discard the milk solids in the cloth, then pour the clarified butter into three 4-ounce jars or one 12-ounce jar and cover tightly.

    To prepare the halibut, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and fresh thyme. Set it on a plate and let it rest a bit while you melt the butter in a wide skillet over medium-high heat. Once the butter melts, arrange the seasoned halibut skin side-down in the hot fat, and sear for four to five minutes, until the skin crisps and browns. Flip the fish, and continue cooking for another two to three minutes, until it flakes easily when pierced by a fork. Transfer the halibut to a serving plate, and tent it with parchment paper or foil to keep it warm.

    To prepare the tomatoes, set the skillet over medium heat and pour the olive oil into the pan that you used to cook the fish. Toss in the shallot and garlic, and sauté them in the oil, stirring frequently, until they release their fragrance and become translucent, about six minutes. Toss in the cherry tomatoes, and sauté them with the garlic and shal­lot until they release their juice and soften in the hot pan, about two minutes. Stir in the tarragon and continue cooking, stirring frequently, for one minute. Uncover the waiting halibut. Spoon the melted cherry tomato mixture over the fish, and serve immediately. Source + image: The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther