Alternative Medicine

  • The Cranberry’s Hidden Power

    It’s a bit of a taboo topic. It can be painful or embarrassing. It can wake you up at night or make you nervous to leave home. And if you have one, you know it without a doubt: It’s a urinary tract infection.

    Safe, simple, and successful UTI prevention
    By Dan Souza
  • Getting the Language Right

    My present home in Puerto Rico has made news lately with its significant debt problems. The island’s leaders are trying to find solutions. One hears them talking on the radio or TV news or sees them editorializing about the solutions for nuestro pais—“our country.”

    From Medical Industry to a System for Creating Health
    By John Weeks
  • Attack of the Autoimmune Disease

    You may hear a lot of buzz on the topic of autoimmune diseases, but what exactly does that mean? Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the body. According to womenshealth.gov, 23.5 million people living in the US suffer from autoimmune diseases.

  • 6 Ways to Ease Headache Symptoms

    The first week of June is National Headache Awareness Week, so before you reach for prescription meds, consider a more holistic approach to curbing those nasty headaches.

    For a tension headache:

    >> Apply peppermint oil on your hairline.

    >> Make ginger tea by taking ginger root and adding it to boiling water.

  • How to Make Yoga Part of your Routine

    You know the drill. Wake up. Get the kids up. Make them breakfast. Get them ready for day. Whether you’re sending them off to school or preparing for play dates, it’s hard to find a moment for yourself. If you can barely squeeze in a shower during the week, how can you find time for a personal yoga practice?

    Creating space for a personal practice
    By Kristin Henningsen, MS, RYT
  • The Internal Cleanse

    The human body performs countless amazing functions every day, so it should come as no surprise that it is perfectly capable of cleaning and filtering out impurities. However, because of the overwhelming amount of toxins that we are exposed to daily, many in the medical community agree that an internal cleanse is now essential for optimal health.

    Ridding the body of today’s toxins
    By Del Williams
  • Buttered Spinach

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    2 large bunches young spinach (about 1 ¼ pounds)

    1 tablespoon unsalted butter

    ½ teaspoon finely ground unrefined sea salt

    ¼ teaspoon ground white pepper

    2 hard-cooked eggs, minced

    Trim the spinach of any tough stems or veins, then coarsely chop the spinach leaves. Toss the spinach into a large, heavy stockpot. Set it on the stove over medium-low heat, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, and cook for 15 to 20 minutes, until wilted. Drain the wilted spinach in a colander, and press it down to remove any excess liquid. Return the pot to the stove, add the butter, and melt over low heat. Toss in the spinach. Stir in the salt, white pepper, and minced egg, then serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther

  • Sweet-and-Sour Asian Cabbage and Kale

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    SERVES 4

    1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons tamari

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    1 tablespoon Grade B maple syrup

    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    4 cups stemmed and chopped lacinato kale, in bite-size pieces

    Sea salt

    2 cups shredded red cabbage

    1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

    Put the tamari, lime juice, maple syrup, toasted sesame oil, and ginger in small bowl and stir to combine. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the kale and a pinch of salt and sauté for four minutes. Add the cabbage and another pinch of salt and sauté for two minutes. Add the tamari mixture and cook until tender, about two minutes. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson.

  • Cider-Braised Kale with Apples and Sweet Cherries

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4-6

    2 tablespoons bacon fat

    1 small red onion, thinly sliced

    2 bunches Lacinato kale, stems removed and leaves coarsely chopped

    1 apple, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced

    1 cup dried sweet cherries

    ¼ cup hard cider

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    Melt the bacon fat in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Toss the red onion into the hot fat and fry until fragrant and softened, about three minutes. Stir in the apples and fry them until tender enough to pierce with a fork, about four minutes, then toss in the kale, and cook until barely wilted. It should only take a minute. Stir the sweet cherries and hard cider into the wilted kale and apples. Simmer until the liquid is mostly evaporated, about five minutes. Stir in the apple cider vinegar and serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther

  • Indian Greens

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    8 cups stemmed and chopped Swiss chard, in bite-size pieces

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    ¼ teaspoon cumin seeds

    ¼ teaspoon black or brown mustard seeds

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    ½ teaspoon turmeric

    ¼ teaspoon curry powder

    1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Sea salt

    1 cup canned diced tomatoes, juices reserved

    1 cup canned chickpeas, drained, rinsed, and mixed with a spritz of lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt

    ¼ cup coconut milk

    ¼ teaspoon Grade B maple syrup

    Put the chard in a large bowl, add cold water to cover, and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the cumin seeds and mustard seeds and sauté until they begin to pop. Immediately stir in the ginger. Add the chard, turmeric, curry powder, pepper, a pinch of salt, and 2 tablespoons of the juice from the tomatoes. Sauté for two minutes. Add the chickpeas and tomatoes and sauté for three minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and maple syrup and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson; Photo Credit: Leo Gong.