Departments

  • Indian Greens

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    8 cups stemmed and chopped Swiss chard, in bite-size pieces

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    ¼ teaspoon cumin seeds

    ¼ teaspoon black or brown mustard seeds

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    ½ teaspoon turmeric

    ¼ teaspoon curry powder

    1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Sea salt

    1 cup canned diced tomatoes, juices reserved

    1 cup canned chickpeas, drained, rinsed, and mixed with a spritz of lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt

    ¼ cup coconut milk

    ¼ teaspoon Grade B maple syrup

    Put the chard in a large bowl, add cold water to cover, and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the cumin seeds and mustard seeds and sauté until they begin to pop. Immediately stir in the ginger. Add the chard, turmeric, curry powder, pepper, a pinch of salt, and 2 tablespoons of the juice from the tomatoes. Sauté for two minutes. Add the chickpeas and tomatoes and sauté for three minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and maple syrup and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson; Photo Credit: Leo Gong.

  • Sweet-and-Sour Asian Cabbage and Kale

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    SERVES 4

    1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons tamari

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    1 tablespoon Grade B maple syrup

    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    4 cups stemmed and chopped lacinato kale, in bite-size pieces

    Sea salt

    2 cups shredded red cabbage

    1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

    Put the tamari, lime juice, maple syrup, toasted sesame oil, and ginger in small bowl and stir to combine. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the kale and a pinch of salt and sauté for four minutes. Add the cabbage and another pinch of salt and sauté for two minutes. Add the tamari mixture and cook until tender, about two minutes. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson.

  • Smoothie Central

    These good-for-you green smoothies will taste great, fill you with nutrients, and keep you energized. Pick a recipe, combine all ingredients in a blender, and blend from low to high until frosty smooth. Boost it to increase the wellness value or flavor profile of your smoothie.

     

    Kale Sunshine Refresh

    ½ cup soy or almond milk

  • Keep Your Peepers!

    According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are considered to be visually impaired. 65 percent are 50 years old or older. Here are some ways to prevent and ease the loss of sight:

    >> Eat veggies rich in beta-carotene and vitamin A, such as squash and carrots.

  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 1 SERVING

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • All About: Lavender Tea

    What it is: Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is an herb with a very strong scent. It is common in lotions, baking, detergents, perfumes, and tea.

  • Primal Eating (In a Nutshell)

    Primal eating is booming. The rationale behind it is simple: Our genome hasn’t changed much over the past 10,000 years, but our diet now is very different from what we’re adapted to, leading to a glut of chronic disease. Here’s a quick guide to primal foods:

    Primal supplements

  • Stress: Know Your Signs

    April is Stress Awareness Month and experts have spoken out about the damaging effects stress has on the body. Even those illnesses that just won’t seem to go away could, in fact, be caused by underlying stress. Do you know the signs of stress? If not, here are a few to look for and to bring up to your healthcare profes­sional at your next checkup:

    >> Anxiety

  • Good Stress vs. Bad Stress

    The National Institute of Mental Health defines stress as “the brain’s response to any demand.” Change is thought to be a main trigger for stress, though it can be either positive or negative.

  • All About Arbor Day

    >> The first Arbor Day started when J. Sterling Morton oversaw the planting of one million trees.

    >> The National Association of State Foresters, the Arbor Day Foundation, and the US Forest Service help plant the trees found in America’s national and state forests.

    >>  Some places around the world take a whole week to celebrate Arbor Day!