Departments

  • All About: Ginger Tea

    WHAT IT IS: Ginger is an underground root-like stem of the ginger (Zingiber officinale) plant. It has a pungent, spicy aroma and is commonly used in cooking, baking, and herbal remedies.

  • 6 Ways to Ease Headache Symptoms

    The first week of June is National Headache Awareness Week, so before you reach for prescription meds, consider a more holistic approach to curbing those nasty headaches.

    For a tension headache:

    >> Apply peppermint oil on your hairline.

    >> Make ginger tea by taking ginger root and adding it to boiling water.

  • Wanna Soak Up the Sun?

    Relaxing in the warmth of a summer day not only feels great, but it’s also an excellent way to raise your vitamin D levels. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which is needed to maintain strong bones. This important nutrient also helps muscles to move, nerves to communicate, and the immune system to fight off infections.

  • Getting the Language Right

    My present home in Puerto Rico has made news lately with its significant debt problems. The island’s leaders are trying to find solutions. One hears them talking on the radio or TV news or sees them editorializing about the solutions for nuestro pais—“our country.”

    From Medical Industry to a System for Creating Health
    By John Weeks
  • Mooo-ve Over, Conventional Milk

    Researchers found some organic milk contains more heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids than regular milk. The secret is in grass-fed, hormone-free cows, which allows the milk’s protein level to increase and helps balance the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio. Too much omega-6 is linked to cancer, heart disease, cardiovascular complications, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases.

  • Urban Herbs

    Have you always wanted your own herb garden, but the confines of city living have hindered your growing space? Follow these steps and with the right tools, some sunshine, and a little TLC, you’ll find the recipe for success in bringing your urban herb garden to life.

    >> Clear a space in a sunny spot.

  • Magnesium: The Key to Heart Health

    Recently the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiologists issued a joint statement urging a wider use of cholesterol drugs called “statins” to help prevent America’s No. 1 killer: heart disease.

    By Dennis Goodman, MD, FACC
  • The Green Guide

    I understand how intimidating bunches of kale, chard, and collards can look on those grocery shelves. The only lettuce I ate growing up was some iceberg drowned in Thousand Island.

    How to buy, prepare, store, and cook with leafy greens
    By Dreena Burton
  • Cider-Braised Kale with Apples and Sweet Cherries

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4-6

    2 tablespoons bacon fat

    1 small red onion, thinly sliced

    2 bunches Lacinato kale, stems removed and leaves coarsely chopped

    1 apple, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced

    1 cup dried sweet cherries

    ¼ cup hard cider

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    Melt the bacon fat in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Toss the red onion into the hot fat and fry until fragrant and softened, about three minutes. Stir in the apples and fry them until tender enough to pierce with a fork, about four minutes, then toss in the kale, and cook until barely wilted. It should only take a minute. Stir the sweet cherries and hard cider into the wilted kale and apples. Simmer until the liquid is mostly evaporated, about five minutes. Stir in the apple cider vinegar and serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther

  • Buttered Spinach

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    2 large bunches young spinach (about 1 ¼ pounds)

    1 tablespoon unsalted butter

    ½ teaspoon finely ground unrefined sea salt

    ¼ teaspoon ground white pepper

    2 hard-cooked eggs, minced

    Trim the spinach of any tough stems or veins, then coarsely chop the spinach leaves. Toss the spinach into a large, heavy stockpot. Set it on the stove over medium-low heat, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, and cook for 15 to 20 minutes, until wilted. Drain the wilted spinach in a colander, and press it down to remove any excess liquid. Return the pot to the stove, add the butter, and melt over low heat. Toss in the spinach. Stir in the salt, white pepper, and minced egg, then serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther