Departments

  • Seasonal Allergies

    For millions of Americans, even the thought of allergies has them reaching for their inhalers or antihistamines.

    The Shocking Reason You Suffer from Chronic Sinus Problems
    By Sherry Torkos, BSc, Phm
  • Cooking Raw Foods

    In most nutritional battles, raw foods trump cooked foods—particularly raw veggies, which are low in calories and thus more appealing to those trying to lose weight. After all, you can chomp on pea pods all day long, but do the same with potato chips and your belly is bound to become bloat city.

    How to Achieve Nutritional Balance
    By Erica Tasto
  • Cook to Cut Cancer

    Before you top your salad with those raw diced tomatoes, you may want to consider first tossing them on the stove. Studies suggest that lycopene—an antioxidant compound that gives foods such as tomatoes, watermelon, and papaya their rosy hue—is more absorbable by the body after the food is heated.

    The Link Between Antioxidants, the Big “C,” and Other Diseases
    By Erica Tasto
  • Carrot, Avocado, and Turmeric Soup

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    A little spicy and a little sweet, this soup is easy to make and even better to enjoy.

    2 ½ cups fresh carrot juice

    1 Haas avocado, peeled and pitted

    ½ teaspoon ginger powder, or 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

    ½ tablespoon tamari

    ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    ¼ cup pumpkin seeds

    Blend all ingredients except the pumpkin seeds in a blender or food processor until rich and creamy. Heat a skillet over medium heat and add pumpkin seeds and a sprinkle of salt. Toast seeds until they turn just golden, then quickly transfer them to a cool plate. Serve soup as-is and top with pumpkin seeds, or heat on stove to desired temperature. Source: Choosing Raw by Gena Hamshaw. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014 Photo credit: Hannah Kaminsky.

    Serves 2

  • Carrot Dogs

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Both kids and adults will want to get their hands on these unique and healthy “hotdogs.”

    2 long, straight carrots (hotdog shaped!)

    2 whole wheat hotdog buns, or 2 slices whole grain bread

    Spinach (cooked and drained, or fresh)

    Ketchup

    Mustard

    Sauerkraut

    Onions (raw, cooked, or caramelized)

    Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Boil carrots 10 to 15 minutes, or until they are hotdog-like soft. Drain and cut them in half lengthwise. Toast buns or bread if you desire. Place the carrots in the buns and top with all your fixings. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 2

  • A Great Tomato Sauce

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    This sauce is the perfect way to make your comfort food justifiably healthy.

    2 tablespoons sunflower oil

    1 clove garlic, crushed

    ½ onion, chopped into small cubes

    2 ½ cups water

    12 ½ ounces vine tomatoes, chopped in half

    ¼ teaspoon balsamic vinegar

    ½ teaspoon umeboshi plum purée

    ½-inch fresh red chili (for spice, optional)

    1 ounce basil

    2 tablespoons coconut milk

    Heat sunflower oil in a pan over medium heat; add garlic and onion and cook for 2 minutes. Add ½ cup of the water to onions and garlic; let onions absorb the water then add 1 cup of water. Add tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, plum purée, and the remaining 1 cup of water. Simmer over medium to low heat for 10 minutes. Add chili, half of the basil, and coconut milk. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Add a little extra water if you like a runny sauce; reduce it further if you like a drier and more intense sauce. Source: Reprinted with permission from Honestly Healthy For Life © 2014 by Natasha Corrett and Vicki Edgson, Sterling Publishing Co, Inc. Photography by Lisa Linder.

    Serves 2

  • Triple Pepper-Crowned Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Eat like royalty with this dish that tastes just as good as it looks.

    2 cups short-grain brown rice

    4 cups vegetable broth

    1 onion, diced

    3 to 4 cloves garlic, minced

    8 ounces mushrooms, sliced

    3 to 4 cups kale, stems removed and leaves torn into pieces and cooked

    Red, yellow, and orange bell peppers, steamed or roasted

    In a rice cooker or on stovetop, prepare the rice as directed using the broth (not water) and add the onion, garlic, and mushrooms. Stir the warm rice for about 1 minute, until it uniformly becomes a bit creamier and stickier—you now have risotto! Arrange a bed of cooked kale on each plate and, using a small bowl or teacup as a mold, scoop about ½ cup of risotto onto the kale. Crown the risotto with peppers and serve with a salad or steamed broccoli. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 4

  • Cancer Caution

    Researchers of the nonprofit Physicians Committee recently released six guidelines for cancer prevention, promoting a plant-based diet to provide an antioxidant boost and maintain a healthy weight. Here’s what their study recommends.

     

    What: Skip the dairy aisle

    Why: To reduce the risk of prostate cancer

  • Nature’s Hidden Healer

    That glass of red wine might offer more benefits to your health than you thought. Resveratrol, an antioxidant compound present in many berries and plants—most abundantly in red grape skins—is said to have healing properties ranging from lowering the risk of heart disease and some cancers to aiding in antidepressive behavior and aging.

    Stay young and healthy with resveratrol
    By Samantha Fischer
  • Don’t Let Joint Pain Slow You Down

    Arthritis is a painful, chronic disease that can have a major impact on quality of life. As joints deteriorate, simple tasks become difficult: opening a jar, walking to the mailbox, handling tools. With time, mobility becomes more restricted. What’s worse, arthritis sufferers must face the unkind reality that their condition may gradually worsen.

    Take control of your arthritis with these natural remedies
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc