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  • 10 Reasons to Go Organic

    Every year more and more savvy consumers are going organic, and it seems that every year the stakes get higher. From protecting the health of your family in future generations to preventing the collapse of the bee population, shrinking the oceans’ dead zones, and doing your part to reduce climate change, here are 10 research-supported resolutions you can adopt this year.

  • All About Arbor Day

    >> The first Arbor Day started when J. Sterling Morton oversaw the planting of one million trees.

    >> The National Association of State Foresters, the Arbor Day Foundation, and the US Forest Service help plant the trees found in America’s national and state forests.

    >>  Some places around the world take a whole week to celebrate Arbor Day!

  • The Canopy Project

    Each year Earth Day celebrates the world we live in by demon­strating support for our environment. This year, earthday.org is putting a special emphasis on The Canopy Project. People participating in The Canopy Project help impoverished commu­nities by planting trees.

  • Health Tips: I Can See Clearly Now…

    Days at work in front of a screen can be followed up by nights on the home computer, leading the American Optometric Association to coin the term “computer vision syndrome.”

    Here are a few ways to fight it, courtesy of leading integrative eye care practi­tioner Edward Kondrot, MD.

  • Brown Algae as Medicine

    Resourceful seaside residents have been eating seaweed for thousands of years. The Native Americans ate it, many prehistoric cultures did, and it is common in Asian cuisine today. What our ancestors knew, science has confirmed: Seaweeds are a healthy foodstuff.

  • Good Stress vs. Bad Stress

    The National Institute of Mental Health defines stress as “the brain’s response to any demand.” Change is thought to be a main trigger for stress, though it can be either positive or negative.

  • Secret Sauce and Positive Side Effects in Whole-Person Care

    Those who grow up experiencing medicine and medical treatment as pharmaceuticals, di­agnostic procedures, and surgery can have trouble with the idea of “positive side effects.”

    By John Weeks
  • Planning a Detox?

    American culture prizes speed. After all, we championed fast food, instant coffee, and microwave cooking. But as you’ve probably noticed in these examples, the fast way is not necessarily the best way—and this is particularly true when detoxifying the body.

    Why you need to take it slow
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Roasted Salmon and Asparagus with Lemon-Caper-Dill Aioli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 4 SERVINGS

    FOR SALMON AND ASPARAGUS

    1 pound asparagus, trimmed

    Cooking spray

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1/2 teaspoon salt, divided

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper, divided

    1 1/2 pounds skinless salmon fillet

    FOR AIOLI

    3/4 cup mayonnaise

    1 clove garlic, minced

    1 teaspoon finely grated organic lemon rind

    1 tablespoon lemon juice

    1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill

    1 tablespoon chopped capers

    2 teaspoons finely minced red onion

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    To make the salmon and asparagus: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Arrange the asparagus in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle with half the salt and pepper. Place the salmon fillet directly on top of the asparagus. Sprinkle with the remaining salt and pepper. Roast the salmon for 18 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork.

    To make the aioli, combine the mayonnaise and the re­maining ingredients in a small bowl until well blended. Serve the salmon and asparagus with aioli. Source: Fast and Simple Gluten-Free by Gretchen F. Brown, RD

  • Maple Nut Granola

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 12 CUPS

    4 cups rolled oats

    2 cups crispy brown rice cereal

    1 1/2 cups unsweetened coconut flakes

    1 cup sliced almonds

    1 cup chopped walnuts

    2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

    1/2 cup virgin coconut oil, melted

    1/2 cup maple syrup

    1 teaspoon almond extract

    Preheat oven to 250 degrees. In large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients. In separate bowl, whisk together oil, syrup, and al­mond extract. Pour wet mixture over dry and stir to coat. Trans­fer mixture to two 9x12-inch glass casserole pans and spread out evenly. Bake 60 minutes or until golden. Turn off oven, but do not remove granola until completely cooled and set. Remove from oven and use spatula to release granola and break into chunks. Store in airtight container. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure