Departments

  • All About: Ginger Tea

    WHAT IT IS: Ginger is an underground root-like stem of the ginger (Zingiber officinale) plant. It has a pungent, spicy aroma and is commonly used in cooking, baking, and herbal remedies.

  • What’s On Your Table?

    Nearly two-thirds of Americans state their main reason for purchasing locally sourced food is to support local businesses (and they will readily pay more to get it).

  • Urban Herbs

    Have you always wanted your own herb garden, but the confines of city living have hindered your growing space? Follow these steps and with the right tools, some sunshine, and a little TLC, you’ll find the recipe for success in bringing your urban herb garden to life.

    >> Clear a space in a sunny spot.

  • Indian Greens

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    8 cups stemmed and chopped Swiss chard, in bite-size pieces

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    ¼ teaspoon cumin seeds

    ¼ teaspoon black or brown mustard seeds

    1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

    ½ teaspoon turmeric

    ¼ teaspoon curry powder

    1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    Sea salt

    1 cup canned diced tomatoes, juices reserved

    1 cup canned chickpeas, drained, rinsed, and mixed with a spritz of lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt

    ¼ cup coconut milk

    ¼ teaspoon Grade B maple syrup

    Put the chard in a large bowl, add cold water to cover, and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the cumin seeds and mustard seeds and sauté until they begin to pop. Immediately stir in the ginger. Add the chard, turmeric, curry powder, pepper, a pinch of salt, and 2 tablespoons of the juice from the tomatoes. Sauté for two minutes. Add the chickpeas and tomatoes and sauté for three minutes. Stir in the coconut milk and maple syrup and serve immediately. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson; Photo Credit: Leo Gong.

  • Cider-Braised Kale with Apples and Sweet Cherries

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4-6

    2 tablespoons bacon fat

    1 small red onion, thinly sliced

    2 bunches Lacinato kale, stems removed and leaves coarsely chopped

    1 apple, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced

    1 cup dried sweet cherries

    ¼ cup hard cider

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    Melt the bacon fat in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Toss the red onion into the hot fat and fry until fragrant and softened, about three minutes. Stir in the apples and fry them until tender enough to pierce with a fork, about four minutes, then toss in the kale, and cook until barely wilted. It should only take a minute. Stir the sweet cherries and hard cider into the wilted kale and apples. Simmer until the liquid is mostly evaporated, about five minutes. Stir in the apple cider vinegar and serve. Source: Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther

  • Buzzword: “Text Neck”

    Text neck: The act of people hunching over their mobile gadgets, which leads to neck strain, headaches, and pain in the shoulders and even hands and arms. This pain can last a lifetime if habits don’t change. Source: NBC News

    Fixing text neck

  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 1 SERVING

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • All About: Lavender Tea

    What it is: Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is an herb with a very strong scent. It is common in lotions, baking, detergents, perfumes, and tea.

  • Primal Eating (In a Nutshell)

    Primal eating is booming. The rationale behind it is simple: Our genome hasn’t changed much over the past 10,000 years, but our diet now is very different from what we’re adapted to, leading to a glut of chronic disease. Here’s a quick guide to primal foods:

    Primal supplements

  • Stress: Know Your Signs

    April is Stress Awareness Month and experts have spoken out about the damaging effects stress has on the body. Even those illnesses that just won’t seem to go away could, in fact, be caused by underlying stress. Do you know the signs of stress? If not, here are a few to look for and to bring up to your healthcare profes­sional at your next checkup:

    >> Anxiety